Getting into Law School

There is no single course of study required for admission into law school.  Law schools accept applications from virtually all majors and every discipline.  Law schools look for applicants with specific courses such as political science, philosophy, sociology, and history.  Law schools also look for applicants with quantitative courses such as economics, business, math, and finance.  A broad and varied undergraduate education is often considered as the best way to the legal profession.

An applicant must demonstrate

-a solid academic record and a LSAT score
-professional commitment
-maturity and intellectual ability
-experience and purpose
-strong skills in analyzing, advocating, counseling, writing, speaking and negotiation.

The most important factor in law school admissions is an applicant’s score on the LSAT.  In addition, the candidate must have high GPA.  GPA is a measure of a student’s academic achievement at a college or university; calculated by dividing the total number of grade points received by the total number attempted.  Most law schools require two or three letters of recommendation.  Another significant factor in law school admisssion is the candidate’s personal statement.  It is also important that an applicant has a good financial credit record because law school is expensive.


Inside Getting into Law School