The LSAT Exam

The LSAT exam is a prerequisite for law school admission.  The LSAT is offered four times per year at various locations throughout the world.  All American Bar Association-approved law schools, most Canadian law schools and many other schools require applicants take the LSAT as part of their admission process.  Participants can take the LSAT more than once.  However, while some schools may accept the best score produced by an applicant, many schools will average the scores together.

There are four sections of the exam including logical reasoning (arguments), reading comprehension, analytical reasoning (games), and a writing sample. The logical reasoning (arguments) portion of the LSAT consists of two sections of the LSAT, while reading comprehension, analytical reasoning (games), and the writing sample only have one section each. Each section is allocated 35 minutes.  There is no penalty for getting wrong answers.

The logical reasoning sections contain approximately 24 questions each.  The analytical reasoning (games) section of the LSAT consists of four analytical reasoning (games) problems.  Each problem has five to six questions.  Therefore, the section will include 22 to 24 questions.  The reading comprehension section usually contains about 25 to 28 questions.  The reading comprehension passages cover a wide breadth of topics.  The passages cover natural science, legal, social science and humanities.

The official LSAT score report can be accessed online or received in the mail.  It features the applicant’s most recent score, placed on a scale from 120 to 180.  The score will be accompanied by a score band, which indicates the range within which the applicant’s actual proficiency is believed to fall.  In addition, the applicant’s score will be given a percentile rank, indicating the percentage of other test-takers who scored lower than him/her.


Inside The LSAT Exam