Oregon Bar Exam Information

The Oregon bar exam consists of 3 components: the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE), the Multistate Performance Test (MPT), and the Oregon essays. There are nine essay questions. The essay topics are selected from the areas of law listed in rule 5.15(2) of the Rules for Admission.  The Oregon Supreme Court promulgates the Rules for Admission.

Bar exam applicants must obtain a scaled score of 85 or higher on the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam (MPRE) in addition to passing the Oregon bar exam.

The Multistate Performance Test (the MPT) is comprised of three 90-minute skills questions covering legal analysis, fact analysis, problem solving, resolution of ethical dilemmas, organization and management of a lawyering task, and communication.

The Multistate Bar Examination (MBE) is a six-hour, 200-multiple-choice-question exam, testing six areas of law.  The six areas are: Contracts, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Evidence, Real Property, and Torts.  

The scoring pattern for the Oregon bar exam is:

The successful applicant will receive a combined scaled score of 65.00.  Applicants also must pass the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE) with a scaled score of 85 within two years of passing the bar exam.

The following subjects may be tested on the Oregon bar exam:

  • business organizations, including
    • corporations
    • partnerships
  • civil litigation, including
    • civil procedure  (federal and Oregon)
    • evidence  (federal and Oregon)
  • commercial transactions, including
    • agency
    • contracts, including UCC Article 2 sales 
    • UCC Articles 1 (general provisions), 2 (sales), 9 (secured transactions)
  • legal ethics (Oregon Rules of Professional Conduct)
  • property, including
    • decedents’ estates (wills)
    • real property
    • trusts (wills)
  • public law, including
    • administrative law and procedure (federal and Oregon)
    • constitutional law
    • criminal law and procedure
    • federal income taxation
  •  torts.

Inside Oregon Bar Exam Information